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Our Association

The State Water Contractors is an association of 27 public water agencies, working together to provide clean drinking water to more than 27 million residents and 750,000 acres of farmland throughout the state. We work to protect the environment and public health, and promote water conservation and greater efficiency at a time when we need it most.

Our Association

The State Water Contractors is an association of 27 public water agencies, working together to provide clean drinking water to more than 27 million residents and 750,000 acres of farmland throughout the state. We work to protect the environment and public health, and promote water conservation and greater efficiency at a time when we need it most.

WHAT WE DO 

The State Water Contractors (SWC) is an organization formed of 27 of the public water agencies and represents the legal, policy and regulatory interests of the State Water Project contractors, who are responsible for the capital and operations and maintenance costs of the SWP. The SWC works in partnership with other water organizations, and coordinates with Department of Water Resources on behalf of its members.

Additionally, the SWC invests over $2 million annually to implement a science and research program – collaborating with our partners in academia, government, non-profit and the private sectors to invest in new research and other programs that will spur future policymaking and improved water management practices throughout California.

OUR PRIORITIES 

The SWP is California’s most critical infrastructure and must be maintained for future generations.

That is why the SWC is committed to:

  • Promoting reliable SWP water supplies
    • Promoting science-based decision making
    • Promoting sound fiscal management of the SWP
    • Maintaining the operational integrity of the SWP  
    • Assuring an affordable and reliable electrical supply for the SWP

 

It has become easy to not fully appreciate the momentous work being done behind the scenes every day to keep California’s taps on. Just as we should not take for granted our interstate highway, railway, or telecommunication systems, we must not underestimate the important management and operation efforts in place to make the SWP possible for California.  

Climate change is creating a new normal in California—prolonged periods of drought, reduced snowpack, flashier and more unpredictable rainfall and sea level rise. Now more than ever, we must investment in the SWP so it may continue to serve 27 million SWC customers, helping to grow the food we eat and sustain the businesses that drive our economy.